2damnfeisty:

eludible:

Mosquitos are so rude, like who gave you permission to bite my ass?

nooffswitch:

"No labels" rhetoric isolates people from their community, history and culture. It keeps people from being able to articulate themselves and ask for what they need.It promotes a false sense of unity that only serves to further the dominant classes in society. It is a lazy way of getting out of understanding and digesting complex issues.I dislike this rhetoric and approach.

White men have been raised to believe that they’re God; most gay white men are marginal in only one respect. Much of the gay white movement seeks to be included in the american dream and is angered when they do not receive the standard white male privileges, misnamed as “american democracy.” Often, white gay men are working NOT to change the system. This is one of the reasons why the gay male movement is as white as it is.
— Audre Lorde, in “Sadomasochism: Not About Condemnation (An Interview with Audre Lorde)” from I Am Your Sister: Collected and Unpublished Writings of Audre Lorde. Edited by Rudolph P. Byrd, Johnnetta Betsch Cole, and Beverly Guy-Sheftall. (2009)
The only thing I HAVE to do is stay black and die.
— African American proverb (via blackproverbs)
Vause | denim overall pants, white mesh sandals, and white sports bra

thempress:

Shoutout to all those black kids in predominantly white environments who had to learn how to navigate when they were too “black” for white spaces and too “white” for black spaces.  

sandookchi:

OMG OMG this happened! A dialogue between Laverne Cox and bell hooks.*squeals excitedly*

image

Listening to bell hooks is always a profound experience.

"No matter how popular Laverne Cox becomes […] she still has to go out in this mean world of hatred that we as people of color, as people of varied sexual identities and practices, will always, until we change the imperialist, white supremacist, capitalist patriarchy, have to confront" - bell hooks

womenwhokickass:

BREAKING: Malala Yousafzai Wins Nobel Peace Prize

Malala, now 17, was shot in the head by a Taliban gunman two years ago in her home country of Pakistan after coming to prominence for her campaigning for education for girls.
She won for what the Nobel committee called her “heroic struggle” for girls’ right to an education.
She is the youngest ever winner of the prize. (x)